Archivo de la categoría: Filosofía

Handbook of the History of Logic. Volume 03: The Rise of Modern Logic: From Leibniz to Frege

handbook logic

Description:
With the publication of the present volume, the Handbook of the History of Logic turns its attention to the rise of modern logic. The period covered is 1685-1900, with this volume carving out the territory from Leibniz to Frege. What is striking about this period is the earliness and persistence of what could be called ‘the mathematical turn in logic’. Virtually every working logician is aware that, after a centuries-long run, the logic that originated in antiquity came to be displaced by a new approach with a dominantly mathematical character. It is, however, a substantial error to suppose that the mathematization of logic was, in all essentials, Frege’s accomplishment or, if not his alone, a development ensuing from the second half of the nineteenth century. The mathematical turn in logic, although given considerable torque by events of the nineteenth century, can with assurance be dated from the final quarter of the seventeenth century in the impressively prescient work of Leibniz. It is true that, in the three hundred year run-up to the Begriffsschrift, one does not see a smoothly continuous evolution of the mathematical turn, but the idea that logic is mathematics, albeit perhaps only the most general part of mathematics, is one that attracted some degree of support throughout the entire period in question. Still, as Alfred North Whitehead once noted, the relationship between mathematics and symbolic logic has been an “uneasy” one, as is the present-day association of mathematics with computing. Some of this unease has a philosophical texture. For example, those who equate mathematics and logic sometimes disagree about the directionality of the purported identity. Frege and Russell made themselves famous by insisting (though for different reasons) that logic was the senior partner. Indeed logicism is the view that mathematics can be re-expressed without relevant loss in a suitably framed symbolic logic. But for a number of thinkers who took an algebraic approach to logic, the dependency relation was reversed, with mathematics in some form emerging as the senior partner. This was the precursor of the modern view that, in its four main precincts (set theory, proof theory, model theory and recursion theory), logic is indeed a branch of pure mathematics. It would be a mistake to leave the impression that the mathematization of logic (or the logicization of mathematics) was the sole concern of the history of logic between 1665 and 1900. There are, in this long interval, aspects of the modern unfolding of logic that bear no stamp of the imperial designs of mathematicians, as the chapters on Kant and Hegcl make clear. Of the two, Hcgel’s influence on logic is arguably the greater, serving as a spur to the unfolding of an idealist tradition in logic – a development that will be covered in a further volume, British Logic in the Nineteenth Century.

Descarga:

https://we.tl/t-uw8IHmGsF9

Twitter: @somacles

YouTube: Xochiatoyatl Media

Instagram: cabritocimarron

Descarga: Hans Blumenberg, “La legitimación de la Edad Moderna”

blumenberg

Hans-Blumenberg

 

In this book, Hans Blumenberg disputes the view that the modern idea of progress represents a secularization of religious belief in some divine intervention (the coming of the Messiah, the end of the world) which consummates human history from outside. Drawing from sources ranging from Aristotle and Augustine to Nietzsche, Marx, Freud, and Kuhn – with an impressive number of stops between – he argues that progress always implies a process at work within history, a process that ultimately expresses human choices, human self-assertion, and man’s responsibility for his own fate.Hans Blumenberg has been associated with Kiel University in Hamburg since 1947. The book is included in the series Studies in Contemporary German Social Thought.

Table of contents :
The Legitimacy of the Modern Age……Page 2
Contents……Page 4
Series Foreword……Page 8
Translator’s Introduction……Page 10
Part I: Secularization: Critique of a Category of Historical Wrong……Page 32
Status of the Concept……Page 34
A Dimension of Hidden Meaning?……Page 44
Progress Exposed as Fate……Page 58
Instead of Secularization of Eschatology, Secularization, by Eschatology……Page 68
Making History So As to Exonerate God?……Page 84
The Secularization Thesis as an Anachronism in the Modern Age……Page 94
The Supposed Migration of the Attribute of Infinity……Page 108
Political Theology I and II……Page 120
Part II: Theological Absolutism and Human Self-Assertion……Page 154
Introduction……Page 156
World Loss and Demiurgic Self-Determination……Page 168
A Systematic Comparison of the Epochal Crisis of Antiquity to That of the Middle Ages……Page 176
The Impossibility of Escaping a Deceiving God……Page 212
Cosmogony as a Paradigm of Self-Constitution……Page 236
Part III: The ‘Trial’ of Theoretical Curiosity……Page 258
Introduction……Page 260
The Retraction of the Socratic Turning……Page 274
The Indifference of Epicurus’s Gods……Page 294
Skepticism Contains a Residue of Trust in the Cosmos……Page 300
Preparations for a Conversion and Models for the Verdict of the ‘Trial’……Page 310
Curiosity Is Enrolled in the Catalog of Vices……Page 340
Difficulties Regarding the ‘Natural’ Status of the Appetite for Knowledge in the Scholastic System……Page 356
Preludes to a Future Overstepping of Limits……Page 374
Interest in Invisible Things within the World……Page 392
Justifications of Curiosity as Preparation for the Enlightemnent……Page 408
Curiosity and the Claim to Happiness: Voltaire to Kant……Page 434
The Integration into Anthropology: Feuerbach and Freud……Page 468
Part IV: Aspects of the Epochal Threshold: The Cusan and the Nolan……Page 486
The Epochs of the Concept: of an Epoch……Page 488
The Cusan: The World as God’s Self-Restriction……Page 514
The Nolan: The World as God’s Self-Exhaustion……Page 580
Notes……Page 628
Name Index……Page 702

 

Descarga:

Hans Blumenberg-The Legitimacy of the Modern Age (Studies in Contemporary German Social Thought)-The MIT Press (1985)

Twitter: @somacles

YouTube: Xochiatoyatl Media

Instagram: cabritocimarron

 

Descarga: Carl Schmitt, “El Leviatán en la doctrina del Estado de Thomas Hobbes”

Carl Schmitt - El leviatán en Hobbes

Captura de pantalla 2018-07-30 a las 0.19.26

Descarga: 

(Biblioteca de ética filosofía del derecho y política 109) Schmitt Carl-El Leviatán en la doctrina del Estado de Thomas Hobbes-Fontamara

Twitter: @somacles

YouTube: Xochiatoyatl Media

Instagram: cabritocimarron

Descarga: G.S. Kirk & J.E. Raven “Los filósofos presocráticos”

presocráticos

Table of contents :
PREFACIO A LA SEGUNDA EDICIÓN……Page 3
LAS FUENTES DE LA FILOSOFÍA PRESOCRATICA……Page 8
CAPÍTULO I – LOS PRECURSORES DE LA COSMOGONÍA FILOSÓFICA……Page 15
CAPÍTULO II – TALES DE MILETO……Page 101
CAPÍTULO III – ANAXIMANDRO DE MILETO……Page 131
CAPÍTULO IV – ANAXIMENES DE MILETO……Page 187
CAPÍTULO V – JENÓFANES DE COLOFÓN……Page 212
CAPÍTULO VI – HERÁCLITO DE ÉFESO……Page 236
LA FILOSOFÍA EN EL OCCIDENTE (GRIEGO)……Page 283
CAPITULO VII – PITÁGORAS DE SAMOS……Page 285
CAPÍTULO VIII – PARMÉNIDES DE ELEA……Page 319
CAPÍTULO IX – ZENÓN DE ELEA……Page 350
CAPÍTULO X – EMPÉDOCLES DE ACRAGAS……Page 373
CAPÍTULO XI – FILOLAO DE CROTONA Y EL PITAGORISMO DEL SIGLO V……Page 432
CAPÍTULO XII – ANAXÁGORAS DE CLAZOMENE……Page 472
CAPÍTULO XIII – ARQUELAO DE ATENAS……Page 515
CAPÍTULO XIV – MELISO DE SAMOS……Page 521
CAPÍTULO XV – LOS ATOMISTAS: LEUCIPO DE MILETO Y DEMÓCRITO DE ABDERA……Page 537
CAPÍTULO XVI – DIÓGENES DE APOLONIA……Page 580
ABREVIATURAS……Page 604

Descarga:

G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven, M. Schofield-Los Filosofos Presocraticos-Gredos (1997)

Twitter: @somacles

YouTube: Xochiatoyatl Media

Instagram: cabritocimarron

Descarga: Jorge Luis Borges, “This Craft of Verse (Charles Eliot Norton Lectures; 1967-1968)”

this craft of verse

Available in cloth, paper, or audio CD Through a twist of fate that the author of Labyrinths himself would have relished, these lost lectures given in English at Harvard in 1967-1968 by Jorge Luis Borges return to us now, a recovered tale of a life-long love affair with literature and the English language. Transcribed from tapes only recently discovered, This Craft of Verse captures the cadences, candor, wit, and remarkable erudition of one of the most extraordinary and enduring literary voices of the twentieth century. In its wide-ranging commentary and exquisite insights, the book stands as a deeply personal yet far-reaching introduction to the pleasures of the word, and as a first-hand testimony to the life of literature. Though his avowed topic is poetry, Borges explores subjects ranging from prose forms (especially the novel), literary history, and translation theory to philosophical aspects of literature in particular and communication in general. Probably the best-read citizen of the globe in his day, he draws on a wealth of examples from literature in modern and medieval English, Spanish, French, Italian, German, Greek, Latin, Arabic, Hebrew, and Chinese, speaking with characteristic eloquence on Plato, the Norse kenningar, Byron, Poe, Chesterton, Joyce, and Frost, as well as on translations of Homer, the Bible, and the Rub??iy??t of Omar Khayy??m. Whether discussing metaphor, epic poetry, the origins of verse, poetic meaning, or his own “poetic creed,” Borges gives a performance as entertaining as it is intellectually engaging. A lesson in the love of literature and in the making of a unique literary sensibility, this is a sustained encounter with one of the writers by whom the twentieth century will be long remembered. (20001106)

Table of contents :
Contents……Page 6
1 / The Riddle of Poetry……Page 8
2 / The Metaphor……Page 28
3 / The Telling of the Tale……Page 50
4 / Word-Music and Translation……Page 64
5 / Thought and Poetry……Page 84
6 / A Poet’s Creed……Page 104
1. The Riddle of Poetry……Page 132
2. The Metaphor……Page 135
3. The Telling of the Tale……Page 139
4. Word-Music and Translation……Page 141
5. Thought and Poetry……Page 144
6. A Poet’s Creed……Page 147
“On This and That Versatile Craft” – Calin-Andrei Mihailescu……Page 150
Index……Page 158

Descarga:

Jorge Luis Borges-This Craft of Verse (Charles Eliot Norton Lectures_ 1967-1968) (2000)

Twitter: @somacles

YouTube: Xochiatoyatl Media

Instagram: cabritocimarron

 

Descarga: The Complete Essays and other Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson

emerson_essays

Ralph_Waldo_Emerson_ca1857_retouched

In 1803, Ralph Waldo Emerson was born in Boston. Educated at Harvard and the Cambridge Divinity School, he became a Unitarian minister in 1826 at the Second Church Unitarian. The congregation, with Christian overtones, issued communion, something Emerson refused to do. “Really, it is beyond my comprehension,” Emerson once said, when asked by a seminary professor whether he believed in God. (Quoted in 2,000 Years of Freethought edited by Jim Haught.) By 1832, after the untimely death of his first wife, Emerson cut loose from Unitarianism. During a year-long trip to Europe, Emerson became acquainted with such intelligentsia as British writer Thomas Carlyle, and poets Wordsworth and Coleridge. He returned to the United States in 1833, to a life as poet, writer and lecturer. Emerson inspired Transcendentalism, although never adopting the label himself. He rejected traditional ideas of deity in favor of an “Over-Soul” or “Form of Good,” ideas which were considered highly heretical. His books include Nature (1836), The American Scholar (1837), Divinity School Address(1838), Essays, 2 vol. (1841, 1844), Nature, Addresses and Lectures (1849), and three volumes of poetry. Margaret Fuller became one of his “disciples,” as did Henry David Thoreau.

The best of Emerson’s rather wordy writing survives as epigrams, such as the famous: “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines.” Other one- (and two-) liners include: “As men’s prayers are a disease of the will, so are their creeds a disease of the intellect” (Self-Reliance, 1841). “The most tedious of all discourses are on the subject of the Supreme Being” (Journal, 1836). “The word miracle, as pronounced by Christian churches, gives a false impression; it is a monster. It is not one with the blowing clover and the falling rain” (Address to Harvard Divinity College, July 15, 1838). He demolished the right wing hypocrites of his era in his essay “Worship”: “. . . the louder he talked of his honor, the faster we counted our spoons” (Conduct of Life, 1860). “I hate this shallow Americanism which hopes to get rich by credit, to get knowledge by raps on midnight tables, to learn the economy of the mind by phrenology, or skill without study, or mastery without apprenticeship” (Self-Reliance). “The first and last lesson of religion is, ‘The things that are seen are temporal; the things that are not seen are eternal.’ It puts an affront upon nature” (English Traits , 1856). “The god of the cannibals will be a cannibal, of the crusaders a crusader, and of the merchants a merchant.” (Civilization, 1862). He influenced generations of Americans, from his friend Henry David Thoreau to John Dewey, and in Europe, Friedrich Nietzsche, who takes up such Emersonian themes as power, fate, the uses of poetry and history, and the critique of Christianity. D. 1882.
Ralph Waldo Emerson was his son and Waldo Emerson Forbes, his grandson.

More: http://www.rwe.org/

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/eme…
http://transcendentalism-legacy.tamu….
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Wa…
http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/201
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/ihas/poet/eme…
http://www.biography.com/people/ralph…
http://www.online-literature.com/emer…
http://www.emersoncentral.com/ (less)

Descarga:

Ralph Waldo. Emerson-The Complete Essays and other Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson -The Modern Library (1950)

Twitter: @somacles

YouTube: Xochiatoyatl Media

Instagram: cabritocimarron

 

Descarga: Platón, “La República”. Editorial Gredos.

platon_republica

Descarga:

platon-dialogos-iv-republica-gredos

Twitter: @somacles

YouTube: Xochiatoyatl Media

Instagram: cabritocimarron

Digital Maps of Spinoza’s Ethics

Digital Maps of Spinoza’s Ethics


John Bagby, a PhD student in philosophy at Boston College, has created multiple visualizations of the argumentative structure of Spinoza’s Ethics and put them online for the philosophical community.

The visualizations allow readers to see and explore how different parts of the text are related to one another, in different ways. Here’s what the “grid by part” graph looks like as a whole:

You can click on one of the nodes, each representing a passage in the text, and see its connections with other passages:

The website includes a key the node numbers:

Which you can consult as you zoom in:

If you don’t care for the grids, there are other visualizations. Here’s a view of the “circle by part” format:

There’s even a “3D” version of the map which you can spin around and fly through. I found that one a bit unwieldy, but perhaps others more familiar with such visualizations will find it helpful.

The project was led by Mr. Bagby, supervised by associate professor of philosophy Jean-Luc Solère, with engineering by Calvin Morooney and Ben Shippee. It was funded by a couple of internal technology grants at Boston College.

It joins some similar works in the digital humanities, including, for example, a digitization of the “geometry” of Spinoza’s Ethicssomemaps of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, a visualization of influence in the history of philosophy, a semantic network of the history of philosophy, and an explorable chart of philosophy based on PhilPapers’s taxonomy.

(via Greta Turnbull)

Descarga: José Alsina, “Teoría Literaria Griega”

alsina_teoria griega

Este libro pretende ser, ante todo, un instrumento de trabajo. Los grandes temas son apuntados con la intención de desbrozar el camino para que el estudioso de la literatura griega, de la mano del profesor, penetre en los grandes temas que plantea el estudio de las letras griegas y profundice en su problemática. La bibliografía se ofrece para dar un panorama del estado de las cuestiones, pero trabajar en las grandes líneas de investigación exige su estudio y su manejo. Cada capítulo puede servir de base para organizar seminarios y debates sobre cuestiones básicas.
Si de la lectura y la reflexión del contenido de estas páginas se obtiene un mejor conocimiento de los aspectos básicos de la literatura helénica, el autor se sentirá agradablemente recompensado.

ÍNDICE GENERAL

ADVERTENCIA PRELIMINAR
PRINCIPALES ABREVIATURAS
INTRODUCCIÓN

PRIMERA PARTE CUESTIONES GENERALES
I. LAS GRANDES TENDENCIAS EN EL ESTUDIO DE LA LITERATURA GRIEGA
1. La ciencia de la literatura
2. El siglo XVIII y el Romanticismo
3. El positivismo y sus caracteres

II. CUESTIONES DE MÉTODO
1. La historia literaria
2. Historia de la historia de la literatura griega
a) El método de la «Geistesgeschichte»
b) La literatura comparada
Un tema específico: literatura griega y literatura romana
c) El método sociológico
d) El método de las generaciones
e) W. Jaeger y los métodos del Tercer Humanismo
f) Psicoanálisis y literatura
g) El estructuralismo literario
h) Tratados de historia de la literatura griega

III. LA TRANSMISIÓN DE LA LITERATURA GRIEGA
1. El libro antiguo: generalidades
2. El libro en los siglos V y IV a. C
3. La difusión y la revisión de las obras
a) Las ilustraciones
b) El título de los libros
c) Interpolaciones, adiciones y revisiones
4. El rollo de papiro y la obra literaria
5. Las ediciones prealejandrinas
6. Las ediciones alejandrinas
Zenódoto (ca. 325-260 a. C.) — Aristófanes de Bizancio (ca. 257-180 a. C.). — Aristarco (ca. 145 a. C.)
7. Del rollo al códice
8. Las selecciones de los siglos II-III d. C.
9. El papel del mundo árabe
10. El estadio bizantino
11. El Humanismo y la conservación de los textos griegos
12. El método de los humanistas

IV. EL LEGADO LITERARIO DE GRECIA
1. La literatura griega perdida
a) Poesía prehomérica
b) El ciclo épico
c) Obras perdidas de Hesíodo
d) Lírica arcaica
e) Prosa científica
f) Tragedia y comedia
g) Literatura helenística
h) Literatura científica
2. Métodos de reconstrucción de obras perdidas
3. El método de Fr. Stoessl
4. El ciclo épico
5. Los autores latinos como instrumento
6. Un caso curioso

SEGUNDA PARTE
EL ESTUDIO EXTRÍNSECO DE LA LITERATURA GRIEGA
I. LA PERIODIZACIÓN LITERARIA
1. El problema
2. La época arcaica
a) La Edad Media griega
b) Influjos de Oriente
c) Los jonios
d) La religión arcaica
e) La literatura arcaica
f) Hesíodo
g) Profetismo arcaico
h) Nueva visión del hombre
i) Crisis
j) Segundo período de la lírica
k) Carácter oral de la poesía arcaica
3. La época clásica: el siglo V
a) Generalidades
b) El siglo v
c) El clima histórico
d) Grupos enfrentados
e) El espíritu de los años 70-60
f) Se rompe la concordia
g) La generación de Pericles
h) Reacción
i) Otros factores de reacción
j) La generación de la guerra
k) Crisis y evasión
Nota adicional
4. El siglo IV
5. La época helenística
a) Rasgos generales
b) Ecumenismo
c) Individualismo
d) La nueva poesía
6. La época romana
7. La llamada «Antigüedad tardía» (Spätantike)
La aparición del cristianismo. — Las primeras manifestaciones literarias del cristianismo — La llamada preparación del neoplatonismo.— La polémica entre helenismo y cristianismo. Su enfrentamiento. — El influjo del helenismo sobre el cristianismo. — La proyección del neoplatonismo sobre el medio cristiano.

II. LITERATURA Y CIENCIAS HUMANAS
Introducción
1. Lingüística y literatura
a) Relaciones entre literatura y lingüística
b) La lingüística como ciencia auxiliar de la literatura
c) Los escritores como forjadores de la lengua
d) La lingüística como modelo metodológico para la literatura
e) El problema de la traducción
2. Literatura y filología
a) La filología griega: principios
b) Algunos problemas filológicos
Falta de datos. — Cronología absoluta y relativa. — Homero y Hesíodo. — Arquíloco. — Píndaro. — Tragedia. — Sófocles. — Eurípides. — Los Diálogos de Platón. — Épocas helenística y romana.
c) Cuestiones de autenticidad y atribución de autor
Dobletes en Homero. — Atribución de autor. — ¿Un nuevo fragmento de Simónides?. — El canto X de la Ilíada. — El final de la Odisea. — Hesíodo. — El Escudo. — Los Himnos homéricos. — Los fragmentos de Tirteo. — Los Epodos de Estrasburgo. — Safo. — Las Anacreónticas. — Teognis. — La tragedia. — Esquilo. — Eurípides. — La tragedia de Giges. — Prosa. — Las cartas. — Teócrito.
3. Literatura y papirología
a) La papirología como ciencia
b) Literatura y papirología
c) Papiros literarios de la época arcaica
d) La época clásica
e) Cuadro de los textos conservados en papiros
4. Arqueología y epigrafía en sus relaciones con la literatura
a) Sentido del capítulo
b) Homero y la arqueología
a) La geografía de los reinos homéricos. — b) Armas y utensilios bélicos. — c) Las instituciones.
c) Arqueología, epigrafía y literatura arcaica
d) El teatro
e) La época helenística: el caso de Menandro
f) El Marmor Parium
g) Retratos de autores
Nota adicional
5. Literatura y sociología
a) Generalidades
b) La obra literaria como documento social
Homero. — Hesíodo. — Época arcaica. — Tirteo. — Alcmán. — La Jonia. — Arquttoco — Alceo y Safo. — Mimnermo. —Solón. — Himnos homéricos. — Píndaro. — El fin del mundo arcaico. — Atenas. — Tragedia. — Sófocles. — Eurípides. — La comedia como documento. — Aristófanes. — La comedia nueva. — Épocas helenística y romana.
c) El escritor y su público
6. Literatura y psicología
a) El estudio psicológico del escritor
b) Lenguaje y visión del mundo
c) La tramoya divina en Homero
d) Problemas de conciencia y temática emparentada
e) El homosexualismo griego
f) El problema del tiempo
g) Temor y angustia
h) El dolor en la tragedia
i) La unidad psicológica del personaje trágico
j) Sueño y desarreglos psíquicos. El psicoanálisis
7. Literatura y mitología
aj Los géneros literarios y el mito
b) Homero
c) Hesíodo
d) La tragedia y el mito
e) La lírica
Safo y Alceo. — Alcmán. — Píndaro y Baquílides.
f) El drama satírico
g) La época helenística
h) Origen del mito
i) Micenas y los orígenes del mito
j) Variantes míticas en la literatura
k) Orientaciones y bibliografía
8. Literatura y religión
a) Literatura ritual y literatura secularizada
b) Elementos básicos de la religión griega
c) Ritos, ceremonias y creencias
Los ritos. —Ritos de purificación. — Los ritos «mágicos». — Sacrificio y ofrenda votiva. — Plegaria. — Las creencias.
d) El influjo de la religión sobre la literatura
La lírica. — Ditirambo. — El peán. — El treno o lamento fúnebre. — La tragedia. — Plegarias y lamentaciones relacionadas con el culto. —Impetratio boni.
e) Literatura y religiosidad
9. Antropología y literatura griega
a) Aparición de nuevos métodos
b) La escuela de Cambridge
c) La escuela francesa
d) Las corrientes más modernas
e) Orientaciones actuales: literatura y antropología
10. Literatura y arte
a) Preliminares sobre el tema
b) Rasgos del arte griego
c) Arte, literatura y Zeitgeist
Homero. — Época arcaica. — El siglo V. — El siglo IV. — El helenismo.
d) Casos concretos
Influjo del arte sobre la poesía. — Influjo de la poesía sobre el arte.
11. Literatura y pensamiento
a) Los presocráticos: generalidades
Anaximandro. — Jenófanes. — La literatura pitagórica. — Heráclito. — Parménides. — Empédocles. — Los últimos presocráticos.
b) La obra de los sofistas
c) El diálogo: generalidades
El diálogo socrático-preplatónico.
— Platón. — El diálogo después de Platón.
d) La literatura protréptica
e) El simposio
f) La carta
g) La literatura cínica
La diatriba. — La parodia. — La sátira.
h) Los tratados científico-técnicos

TERCERA PARTE
EL ESTUDIO INTRÍNSECO DE LA LITERATURA GRIEGA
I. LOS GÉNEROS LITERARIOS
1. El problema
2. La epopeya: estructura, evolución y leyes
3. Épica helenística
4. La lírica
a) La elegía y el yambo. El epigrama
b) La lírica monódica y coral
5. El drama
6. Géneros poéticos menores
7. Géneros en prosa
a) La historiografía
Nota adicional
b) La oratoria
c) La novela
Nota adicional
d) La epistolografía
e) La fábula

II. TRADICIÓN y ORIGINALIDAD
1. Concepto de originalidad
a) Homero
b) Hesíodo
c) Los líricos
Arquíloco. — Tirteo. — Solón. — Safo. — Alcmán. — Estesícoro. — Simónides. — íbico. — Píndaro.
d) Heródoto
e) Tucídides
f) Tragedia
Esquilo. — Sófocles. — Eurípides.
g) Aristófanes y Menandro
h) Teócrito
i) Calimaco
j) Apolonio
k) Polibio
2. Poeta, poesía y creación poética

CUARTA PARTE EL ANÁLISIS DE LA OBRA LITERARIA
I. EL ANÁLISIS DE LA OBRA LITERARIA
1. El contenido
2. La forma
a) Generalidades
b) El nivel sonoro
c) El estrato léxico
Neologismos. — El Kenning. — Los compuestos. — La expresión abstracta. — La cratacresis. — Juegos etimológicos. — Léxicos. — Importancia estilística de las partículas.
d) Entre el léxico y la oración
La expresión polar. — La enálage. — La perífrasis. — La metáfora. — Coloquialismos. — La abundancia.
e) Nivel oracional
f) Las figuras retóricas

APÉNDICE
EL ESTILO DE LOS AUTORES. BIBLIOGRAFÍA
3. Ritmo y verso
a) Generalidades
b) Un poco de historia
c) El verso griego
d) El verso recitado
El hexámetro. — El pentámetro. — El trímetro yámbico. — El tetrámetro trocaico cataléctico. — Los asinartetos.
e) El verso cantado
Los versos de ritmo yámbico. — Versos trocaicos. — Versos dactilicos. — Los anapestos líricos. — Los llamados eolo-coriámbicos. — La métrica eólica. — Los dáctilo-epítritos. — Los docmios. — Otros ritmos.
f) El llamado ethos del verso griego
g) La estrofa
Problemas relacionados con la estrofa. — Relaciones entre estrofa-antístrofa-epodo. — Responsión léxica y fónica. — La antístrofa y la estrofa. — Bibliografía adicional. — Sinopsis: los kóla más frecuentes.
4. Aspectos estilísticos del verso

II. El PROBLEMA DE LA INTERPRETACIÓN
1. Reflexiones preliminares
2. Filología e interpretación
3. La crítica y sus problemas
4. Poetas y críticos ante la poesía
5. ¿Qué sabemos de la Literatura griega?
6. Causas y posibles remedios
7. Conclusión

ÍNDICE GENERAL

Descarga:

Jose-Alsina-TEORIA-LITERARIA-GRIEGA

Twitter: @somacles

YouTube: Xochiatoyatl Media

Instagram: cabritocimarron

Sigue a Arma Uirumque en Facebook.